A.H.M. Jones and the Later Roman Empire (Brill's Series on by David Gwynn

By David Gwynn

The looks in 1964 of A.H.M. Jones' "The Later Roman Empire 284-602: A Social, fiscal, and Administrative Survey" remodeled the research of the overdue vintage international. during this quantity a few best students re-examine the impression of Jones' nice paintings, the affects that formed his scholarship, and the legacy he left for later generations. Jones' old approach, his basic wisdom of overdue Roman political, social, monetary and non secular buildings, and his recognized review of the Decline and Fall of Rome are re-examined right here within the gentle of contemporary study. This quantity bargains a beneficial reduction to lecturers and scholars alike who search to raised comprehend and make the most the valuable source that's the Later Roman Empire. individuals contain Averil Cameron, Peter Garnsey, David Gwynn, Peter Heather, Caroline Humfress, Luke Lavan, Wolfgang Liebeschuetz, Stefan Rebenich, Alexander Sarantis, Roger Tomlin, Bryan Ward-Perkins, and Michael Whitby.

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22 alexander sarantis Methodist minister, Hugh Jones. 60 According to El-Abbabi, he was “in religion a rationalist and a liberal, perhaps above all he was a humanist in the profound sense of the word”. Nevertheless, Jones did appreciate the strength of Christian feeling in the Late Roman Empire,61 and despite his atheism he was extremely respectful of the views of the devout. His great friend Derwas Chitty was a practising Christian, and Jones supported his local church in Fen Ditton, outside Cambridge, where he had bought an old Jacobean mansion.

It is clear that capitatio took different forms in various areas and periods, being a) sometimes a money poll tax and b) sometimes an element (with iugatio) on the assessment of annona. At this point Jones rolls up his sleeves and dives into the legal evidence. The letter concludes with a most revealing sentence: If you could return this (with any comments that occur to you), I shall be grateful, as I might want to use it myself. M. Jones. This last sentence takes us back to a world without computers and photocopiers; but neither it seems did Jones use typewriter, carbon or stencil.

It reads: “particularly those whose authors were so kind as to send me offprints”. The Professor of Ancient History at Cambridge receives many papers and monographs ex officio. If he is a world-figure, his post is the heavier. And that is just the start: the “offprints” of the parenthesis may stand as proxy for the whole range of communication that Jones was involved in with scholars, beginning with colleagues, ex-students and current students. It happens that Jones did not discover the existence of Joseph Bingham’s monumental work on the institutional church through the perusal of some dusty bibliography.

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